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Professor Geraint Johnes

Rate of growth of weekly earnings now well above the rate of inflation

Authors: Professor Geraint Johnes

17 December 2014

The latest release of statistics on the labour market offer almost uniformly good news. Employment levels continued to rise, by 115000, in the latest quarter. Meanwhile unemployment fell by 63000, with the headline rate of unemployment remaining at 6.0%.

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Wendy  Cartwright

HR and employee relations in the 21st Century

Authors: Wendy Cartwright Director of Corporate Services at the University of East London

16 December 2014

Last week's event on the contemporary role of HR which brought together The Work Foundation and Prospect Union, posed a question for the function to consider: Essentially, is HR a ‘custodian of organisational conscience, a deliverer of financial targets or a strategic business leader? ’

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Alan  Bradshaw

HR has left the building. Who’s going to help me now?

Authors: Alan Bradshaw

15 December 2014

Last week I attended a stimulating conference at The Work Foundation organised with Prospect 'The contemporary role of HR: Custodian of organisational conscience, deliverer of financial targets or strategic business leader?'. As a business psychologist who focuses on stress. I speak to thousands of managers every year about stress and have done so since the late 90s. This blog has been informed by that experience.

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Professor Geraint Johnes

Director's December Report

Authors: Professor Geraint Johnes

11 December 2014

The Chancellor’s Autumn Statement earlier this month set out plans for restoring budget balance by 2018-19. These are welcome not least because they have stimulated debate across the political spectrum about how fast government should go in closing the deficit.

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Ian Brinkley

Inequality and growth

Authors: Ian Brinkley

09 December 2014

The most recent OECD report in inequality and growth makes for rather depressing reading. Inequality has increased in most, if not all OECD economies, and in most but not all OECD economies it has reduced the economic growth rate.

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Laura Vernals

Cancer and work – how employers can support staff with fluctuating conditions

Authors: Laura Vernals

09 December 2014

Last month I represented Macmillan at a roundtable event organised by The Work Foundation’s Health at Work Policy Unit, to discuss how employers can be better supported to deal with fluctuating conditions at work. This was a precursor to a report being launched by the Unit in January 2015. Following this event, I was keen to share some thoughts about work and the fluctuating symptoms which cancer can cause.

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Professor Stephen  Bevan

Performance Management – HR Thoroughbred or Beast of Burden?

Authors: Professor Stephen Bevan Director of the centre for workforce effectiveness

08 December 2014

Today at the Work Foundation we co-hosted (with Prospect) an important event looking at the contemporary role of HR. We had a great line-up of speakers, including Lord Monks, Peter Cheese (CIPD), Duncan Gallie (Oxford University), Kay Eldergill HR Director Met Office, Paul Hucknall HR Director Lloyds Banking Group, Richard Heron Vice-President Health & Chief Medical Officer BP and Prof Rosalind Searle, Coventry University. The event posed a number of questions about whether HR should be the custodian of organisational conscience, what ‘good work’ looks like (and how we can generate more), the current state of ‘trust’ in modern organisations and whether performance management processes are ‘fit for purpose’.

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Beth Foley

Does performance-related pay work in the public sector?

Authors: Beth Foley , Kathryn Ray and Tiffany Tsang

04 December 2014

George Osborne’s announcement in last year’s spending review that reforms to progression pay would be taken forward represented a further step in an ongoing trend towards performance pay in the public sector. But can PRP schemes improve performance? Forms of PRP began to be introduced into the UK public sector in the 1990s and, as this process accelerates today, our recent evidence review for the Office of Manpower Economics examines the evidence.

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Professor Geraint Johnes

Autumn Statement lacks a clear vision of the route ahead

Authors: Professor Geraint Johnes

03 December 2014

Today’s Autumn Statement tells us something about the way in which the government sees the economy moving over the next few years, and rather less about how it plans further to reduce the budget deficit.

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Dr Laura Boothman

Care planning and musculoskeletal conditions

Authors: Dr Laura Boothman Policy Manager, Arthritis Research UK

01 December 2014

People with long-term conditions spend far more time self-managing than they do in contact with healthcare services. In recognition of this, approaches that empower people to better manage their own health and wellbeing are well established in health policy:

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Professor Stephen  Bevan

Shared Parental Leave. Not for Losers.

Authors: Professor Stephen Bevan

01 December 2014

We monitor the take-up of paternity leave to help us weed-out the losers’. This was the proud claim of the HR Director of an investment bank we interviewed for a study back in 2002. He was very happy to showcase the bank’s ‘enlightened’ HR policies in public, but privately admitted that any father who took their full paternity leave entitlement could look forward to career stagnation as a result.

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Damian Walne

Supporting and understanding innovation in our cities

Authors: Damian Walne

27 November 2014

Cities” and “Innovation”: Two words buzzing together in current policy debate. In recent months, we have heard the Chancellor of the Exchequer talking up England’s northern cities as a powerhouse for the UK economy; and we have seen Government initiatives of City Deals and Growth Deals with ambitions to promote “innovation”.

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Professor Geraint Johnes

Underemployment figures show labour market slack remains

Authors: Professor Geraint Johnes

25 November 2014

In recent months, we have published a regular series of data on underemployment in the UK - the Bell Blanchflower index. These data have suggested that the extent of underemployment rose markedly during the recession and has remained substantial since. Now the Office for National Statistics (ONS) has released further information on the extent of underemployment. Around 10 per cent of workers employed in the UK are working fewer hours than they want...

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Ian Brinkley

New OECD data reveals public social spending levels remain high in 2014

Authors: Ian Brinkley

24 November 2014

The most recent OECD estimates of public social spending in 2014 – defined as cash benefits to pensioners and the working age population and expenditure on the health and social services – accounted for about 21.7 of UK GDP, just above the OECD average of 21.6 per cent. Moreover, the OECD estimate that public social spending has since 2007 risen by much less in the UK than across the rest of the industrialised world – up 1.6 percentage points in the UK compared with 2.7 percentage points across the OECD.

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Professor Geraint Johnes

The minimum wage and young workers

Authors: Professor Geraint Johnes

19 November 2014

New data have been published today on the incidence of low pay . The figures come from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings and refer to April of each year. Four distinct levels of the national minmum wage are relevant: apprentices in their first year and those aged 16-18 had a minimum wage of £2.68 per hour; for other workers aged 16-17 the minimum wage was £3.72; workers aged 18-20 had a minimum wage of £5.03; and for all other workers the minimum wage was £6.31.

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