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Lilli Hender

Office life: the changing ways of working

Authors: Lilli Hender

28 June 2016

When it comes to design and working practices, office workers have witnessed more than a few changes in recent years. Lilli Hender, from workplace experts OfficeGenie.co.uk, discusses some of the most popular trends

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Professor Geraint Johnes

The sea that chides the banks

Authors: Professor Geraint Johnes

28 June 2016

The months of campaigning are over, and the majority of those voting in the Brexit referendum have determined that the UK should leave the EU. The campaigning period was seen by many to be frustrating, not least because neither side succeeded in engaging fully with the concerns of the other - it became less of a debate than a shouting match.

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Louise Aston

How you can help end the culture of silence on mental health at work

Authors: Louise Aston

22 June 2016

The Work Foundation is supporting, with Mind, ILM, Maudsley Learning at Work, Mental Health First Aid, the Business in the Community (BITC) survey on mental wellbeing.

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Dr Cathy Garner FSS FRSA

Spotlight on Older Workers

Authors: Dr Cathy Garner FSS FRSA

15 June 2016

It was a pleasure to take part in a lively debate at the APPG for Skills and Employment when I gave evidence on older workers and the challenges of retention, re-training and re-skilling. With the prediction that there will be 12.5 million job vacancies by 2022 but only some 7 million to fill them, longer working lives will be an increasing feature of the coming years.

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Ian Brinkley

Latest labour market figures June 2016

Authors: Ian Brinkley

15 June 2016

The labour market saw some modest improvement with a slight fall in the unemployment rate comparing the three months to April 2016 with the previous six months. There was also a welcome fall in the unemployment rate among young people.

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Debbie Abrahams MP

Is welfare to work, working well - a review by Debbie Abrahams MP

Authors: Debbie Abrahams MP

13 June 2016

I was delighted to be asked to speak at the launch of the Work Foundation’s new report ‘Is welfare to work, working well? Improving employment rates for people with disabilities and long-term conditions’.

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Ian Brinkley

The robots are really NOT coming for your jobs

Authors: Ian Brinkley

02 June 2016

It seems that growing numbers of people think that robots, AI and other forms of automation will replace humans on such a scale at best will see large scale unemployment or at worst that work will be confined to a minority, requiring radical solutions to avoid social and political disaster. Even the old idea of a universal “basic income” has been dusted off as a solution to the social disruption of the coming machine age.

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Nick Pahl

Is welfare to work, working well? - a review of the report launch from the Society of Occupational Medicine

Authors: Nick Pahl Nick Pahl, CEO, Society of Occupational Medicine

01 June 2016

A review of the 'Is welfare to work, working well?' report launch.

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Cicely Dudley

Is welfare to work, working well?

Authors: Cicely Dudley

27 May 2016

Employment rates for people with disabilities and long term conditions (LTCs) have long been below the national average. This is perhaps understandable, when you consider the additional barriers that these people face when both looking for and retaining employment. Data from 2014 tells us that whilst the national employment rate was 76.1% at that time, only 46.1% of disabled people were in work.

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Ian Brinkley

The latest labour market analysis

Authors: Ian Brinkley

18 May 2016

Growth has resumed in the labour market with an increase of 44,000 comparing Jan-Mar 2016 with the previous three months, but it is much more subdued than in 2015. And for the first time in many quarters, there was no rise in permanent jobs. All of the increase was for the self-employed and temporary employee workers. With weak hiring it is the young, as usual, who loose out. Overall unemployment remained unchanged at 5.1 per cent, but unemployment among 18 to 24 year olds went up from 12 per cent to 12.2 per cent.

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Ian Brinkley

The future of work is a degree

Authors: Ian Brinkley

14 April 2016

The latest projections of labour market change from the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) sets out expected changes by sector and occupation over the ten years between 2014 and 2024.

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Dr Zofia Bajorek

Take part in our research - calling all HR professionals

Authors: Dr Zofia Bajorek

24 March 2016

The issues that have the potential to affect an employee’s performance at work are varied and diverse and alongside an increasingly competitive and demanding work environment employees may be experiencing difficulties with managers, financial concerns, depression, anxiety or another mental or physical health condition, as well as personal and family relationship issues. With the health and wellbeing of the working age population now regarded as important for organisational productivity, it is becoming ever more crucial employers have interventions available to improve and maintain the health and productivity of their employees.

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Ian Brinkley

What might restore Sports Direct's reputation

Authors: Ian Brinkley

23 March 2016

The troubled firm Sports Direct seems to be able to do nothing right. Held up as giving capitalism a bad name by, of all people, the Institute of Directors, and widely criticised for alleged poor employment practices the firm is now engaged in a public row with the House of Commons on giving evidence on how the firm treats its workers. Sales and share price have suffered as a result. This is a timely reminder that good employment practice is not a nice to have.

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Ian Brinkley

Underemployment in the UK -the latest figures

Authors: Ian Brinkley

22 March 2016

Policy makers often monitor progress in the labour market by the unemployment rate. It is a key indicator for the Bank of England as the lower the rate of unemployment goes the greater the chance that inflationary pressures will start to build up. For much the same reason it is also watched closely by the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) as it may influence what the OBR thinks will happen to inflation and productivity and that in turn will impact on their judgement on whether the Government’s spending plans are credible.

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Ian Brinkley

The budget and the labour market

Authors: Ian Brinkley

16 March 2016

Employment – still growing but we are at the peak The OBR forecast tells us that employment growth will continue, but a reduced rate compared with the previous five years. The economy is expected to create about 900,000 jobs between 2015 and 2020, with most of the growth coming from employee employment. This is rather less than the 2 million jobs that were being suggested might be achievable before the last Election. Average earnings growth also picks up slowly, from around 2.3 per cent to 3.6 per cent over the same period.

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