This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.Find out more here

GET INVOLVED

To discuss how you and your organisation can get more involved with The Work Foundation, please contact us.

Call 020 7976 3575 or email info@theworkfoundation.com

CONTACT

Charles Levy
Senior Economist
Charles  Levy

The labour market recovers – in some places more than others

Authors: Charles Levy

22 January 2014

Today’s labour market statistics show continuing improvements in the labour market. At the UK level, up to 280,000 additional jobs were gained in the three months to November 2013.

A more detailed analysis of the employment data shows that much of the jobs growth is concentrated in just a few areas of the country.

The Work Foundation’s analysis of the latest data from the ONS Annual Population Survey shows that there were 585,000 additional jobs in England between September 2011 and September 2013. More than 300,000 of these were concentrated in just five Local Enterprise Partnership geographies:

• Greater London – 145,000
• Leeds City Region – 62,000
• *Coast to Capital - 36,000
• Greater Manchester – 35,000
• Greater Cambridge & Greater Peterborough – 27,000

Over the same period, nine Local Enterprise Partnership areas had a net loss in the number of jobs. Cornwall & Isles of Scilly, Greater Lincolnshire, Lancashire, Cumbria and Gloucestershire were all areas with the sharpest drop in employment. 

These headlines indicate that the economic recovery is not evenly balanced. London and neighbouring areas of south eastern England appear to be those parts of the country gaining most employment as the economy recovers. But the growth in some northern cities shows that the recovery must not be simplified as a north-south divide.

Commenting on today’s national labour market statistics we highlighted the issue that aggregate jobs growth does not seem to be feeding through into increasing living standards. Wage growth continues to lag behind inflation, and productivity is falling in both manufacturing and service industries. This matters as productivity increases will be key to any sustained improvement in living standards.

Given this sub-national variance in performance it is increasingly clear that these wage and productivity effects will be playing out very differently across the country. This increases the importance of finding ways to look at local labour markets and for local groups to tailor their policy responses to match their need.

* This is the area to the south of London covering Brighton and Hove, London Borough of Croydon, Gatwick Diamond, Lewes and West Sussex

Comments in Chronological Order (Total 7 Comments)

Jim K

23 Jan 2014 11:40PM

Your map and summary of contrasting changes clearly shows the utter folly of basiing comments solely on the average "recovery" over the whole country. Why of why do politicians never recognise its 95% confidence limits or the range of their data ? Is because they think we are stupid - or because they are?

hivizag

29 Jan 2014 7:41AM

hivizag

www.florenceshopping.org

07 Aug 2014 9:27AM

Shopping for kids' clothing and apparel can be as complicated as, or even more complicated than, shopping for adults' clothing. www.florenceshopping.org

www.thetexaslawyer.org

07 Aug 2014 9:27AM

Use the helpful suggestions and tips offered within this article to better understand the process and steps that are necessary to become a Texas lawyer. www.thetexaslawyer.org

www.oreskylaw.org

07 Aug 2014 9:28AM

A good doctor is often assessed on his bedside manners as well as his healing skills and the legal profession is similar in some respects. www.oreskylaw.org

www.moreabouthealth.org

07 Aug 2014 9:28AM

The sprawling US Medicare system takes into consideration the growing needs of home health care services in the nation. www.moreabouthealth.org

www.healthequation.org

07 Aug 2014 9:28AM

Performance health coaches can take you from flaunting a spare tire around your midsection to being sexy and toned fast. Learn the top reasons to use them. www.healthequation.org